What To Do In The Case Of A House Fire?

I f there is a fire, you must act immediately. Ascertain that you are prepared and that everyone in your household understands precisely what to do. You can take fire safety precautions to keep your family safe in the event of a house fire. While prevention is always the best course of action when it comes to fire safety, you’ll need to know what to do in the event of a fire in your home. Let us walk through the process.

If possible, extinguish the fire

If the fire has only recently started—for example, if a pan on the stove catches fire—you may be able to contain it. Pull the pin, aim for the base of the flames, squeeze the extinguisher handle, and sweep from side to side until the fire is extinguished. Ascertain that the fire has been extinguished completely and is not still smoldering.

Crawl beneath the flames to find a way out

Fire produces smoke and poisonous gases that, if inhaled, can cause dizziness or loss of consciousness—both of which can pose problems when attempting to flee a burning building. To get away from fire and its fumes, crawl to the nearest exit, keeping in mind that it could be a window. Maintaining a low profile will assist in protecting you from inhaling smoke and toxic gases.

Check for heat emanating from doors and door knobs

If you are required to pass through a door to reach an exit, check to see if the door is hot. If the door (or doorknob) feels warm to the touch, there may be a fire on the other side; therefore, avoid passing through it. If you open a door and notice fire or smoke, immediately close it and proceed to a secondary exit.

Evacuate to safety

Once outside, run away from the fire and to safety. A component of the house or apartment, such as the roof or siding, may catch fire and fall around the building’s perimeter, so flee across the street or down the block.

Contact for assistance

Once you have escaped the fire, dial 911. If you do not own a cellphone, approach a neighbor and request to borrow one. Inform the operator that a fire has occurred at your address and then maintain the line open to see if they require any additional information.

If you’re trapped inside

If you become trapped, stuff whatever you can into the cracks around the door: blankets, jackets, towels, etc. If possible, dampen the fabric. Additionally, cover vents with wet blankets to prevent smoke from seeping into the room, and call 911 if you have a phone.

If you become trapped on an upper story of a building, hang sheets or anything else large enough to attract attention out the window to alert firefighters to your location. Make no attempt to pass through the fire.

If your clothing catches fire, you should immediately stop, drop, and roll to extinguish the flames. Additionally, cover your face with your hands as you roll to protect yourself from flames.

Final Remarks

Maintain emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers and fire escape ladders on each floor of your home to assist in putting out any fires that do occur. Once a month, inspecting your smoke alarms can help prevent dead batteries and faulty detectors.

Now that you’re aware of what to do in the event of a fire in your home, the next step is to make fire prevention a top priority. Consider a home security system with integrated fire protection to ensure the safety and well-being of you and your family.

I f there is a fire, you must act immediately. Ascertain that you are prepared and that everyone in your household understands precisely what to do. You can take fire safety precautions to keep your family safe in the event of a house fire. While prevention is always the best course of action when it comes to fire safety, you’ll need to know what to do in the event of a fire in your home. Let us walk through the process.

1. Properly install fire alarms. While it may appear to be a simple task, errors can occur when installing or replacing smoke detectors and fire alarms. The number of detectors, their location and position, as well as the frequency of testing, all contributes to your level of safety and protection.

If possible, extinguish the fire

If the fire has only recently started—for example, if a pan on the stove catches fire—you may be able to contain it. Pull the pin, aim for the base of the flames, squeeze the extinguisher handle, and sweep from side to side until the fire is extinguished. Ascertain that the fire has been extinguished completely and is not still smoldering.

Crawl beneath the flames to find a way out

Fire produces smoke and poisonous gases that, if inhaled, can cause dizziness or loss of consciousness—both of which can pose problems when attempting to flee a burning building. To get away from fire and its fumes, crawl to the nearest exit, keeping in mind that it could be a window. Maintaining a low profile will assist in protecting you from inhaling smoke and toxic gases.

Check for heat emanating from doors and door knobs

If you are required to pass through a door to reach an exit, check to see if the door is hot. If the door (or doorknob) feels warm to the touch, there may be a fire on the other side; therefore, avoid passing through it. If you open a door and notice fire or smoke, immediately close it and proceed to a secondary exit.

Evacuate to safety

Once outside, run away from the fire and to safety. A component of the house or apartment, such as the roof or siding, may catch fire and fall around the building’s perimeter, so flee across the street or down the block.

Contact for assistance

Once you have escaped the fire, dial 911. If you do not own a cellphone, approach a neighbor and request to borrow one. Inform the operator that a fire has occurred at your address and then maintain the line open to see if they require any additional information.

If you’re trapped inside

If you become trapped, stuff whatever you can into the cracks around the door: blankets, jackets, towels, etc. If possible, dampen the fabric. Additionally, cover vents with wet blankets to prevent smoke from seeping into the room, and call 911 if you have a phone.

If you become trapped on an upper story of a building, hang sheets or anything else large enough to attract attention out the window to alert firefighters to your location. Make no attempt to pass through the fire.

If your clothing catches fire, you should immediately stop, drop, and roll to extinguish the flames. Additionally, cover your face with your hands as you roll to protect yourself from flames.

Final Remarks

Maintain emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers and fire escape ladders on each floor of your home to assist in putting out any fires that do occur. Once a month, inspecting your smoke alarms can help prevent dead batteries and faulty detectors.

Now that you’re aware of what to do in the event of a fire in your home, the next step is to make fire prevention a top priority. Consider a home security system with integrated fire protection to ensure the safety and well-being of you and your family.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *